Iceman Mystery

 

Scientists have poked, prodded, and x-rayed the 5,000-year-old mummy found in the Alps. They now think he was murdered.

By Stephen S. Hall
Update (September, 2007): Researchers report that head trauma along with uncontrolled bleeding ultimately killed the Iceman.

It was late spring or early summer, when a modest tree called the hop hornbeam unfurls bright yellow clusters of flowers in the steep valleys that run north into the mountains now known as the Italian Alps. The man hurried through a forest he knew well, wincing from the pain in his injured right hand and pausing occasionally to listen for sounds that he was being pursued. As he fled up the slope, the yellow pollen of the hornbeam blossoms fell like an invisible rain, salting the water and food he consumed when he stopped to rest. Five thousand years later, the Neolithic hunter we call the Iceman would still bear traces of this ancient dusting inside his body—a microscopic record of the time of year it was when he passed through this forest and into the nearby mountains, where fate would finally catch up with him.

Since hikers discovered his mummified corpse in 1991 in a rocky hollow high in the Ötztal Alps on Italy’s border with Austria, scientists have used ever more sophisticated tools and intellectual cunning to reconstruct the life and times of the Iceman (or “Ötzi”), the oldest intact member of the human family. We know that he was a small, sinewy, and, for his times, rather elderly man in his mid-40s. Judging from the precious, copper-bladed ax found with him, we suspect that he was a person of considerable social significance. He set off on his journey wearing three layers of garments and sturdy shoes with bearskin soles. He was well equipped with a flint-tipped dagger, a little fire-starting kit, and a birchbark container holding embers wrapped in maple leaves. Yet he also headed into a harsh wilderness curiously under-armed: The arrows in his deerskin quiver were only half finished, as if he had recently fired all his munitions and was in the process of hastily replenishing them. And he was traveling with a long, roughly shaped stalk of yew—an unfinished longbow, yet to be notched and strung. Why?

When it comes to the Iceman, there has never been a shortage of questions, or theories to answer them. During the 16 years that scientists have poked, prodded, incised, and x-rayed his body, they have dressed him up in speculations that have not worn nearly as well as his rustic garments. At one time or another, he has been mistakenly described as a lost shepherd, a shaman, a victim of ritual sacrifice, and even a vegan. But all these theories fade in the face of the most startling new fact scientists have learned about the Iceman. Although we still don’t know exactly what happened up there on that alpine ridge, we now know that he was murdered, and died very quickly, in the rocky hollow where his body was found.

For further reading, another link: http://www.crystalinks.com/oetzi.html

 

 

No comments

Be the first one to leave a comment.

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Archives

Recent Post

Hacked By Chinafans

Hacked By Chinafans Share this:TweetEmailPrint Related

 

Is there anyone to give right answer of these aassesment? I think You will be able to get the progress of Bangladesh in Flood controls and management shortly. To...

 
Issue of this week (21 August, 2016)

Issue of this week (21 August, 2016)

site de rencontre pour promener son chien prostitute how to site de rencontre cv prostituee et mst club rencontre solo rencontre edarling jeu virtuel gratuit de...

 

Very Good News for Bangladesh!!

It has been published in a daily newspaper that about 16 sq. km land is emerging every year in the coastal area of Bangladesh (Source: Prothom Alo, 05 August, 2016)....

 

Issue of this week

Coastal Tourism Potentiality in Bangladesh Bangladesh has a very beautiful coastal landscape. It can attract both local and foreign tourist. Do you think coastal...

 

Accidental Oil Pollution in the Sundarbans: Preparedness for Response to Ecological Disaster

Abstract: Sundarbans is the largest single mangrove forest of the world. This forest occupies near about 10,000 sq km of which Bangladesh includes about 6,000 sq....

 

Climate Change Induced Tropical Cyclone and Salinity Intrusion in the Sundarbans: An Impediment to the REDD Programs

Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in developing countries, or REDD for short, is a broad set of approaches and actions that will reduce...

 
The Suspended Sediment Loads of Ganges and Brahmaputra basin

The Suspended Sediment Loads of Ganges and Brahmaputra basin

prostituee villeparisis rencontre chaude kinshasa prostituees red dead redemption rencontre artisanal sombernon comment faire rencontre gratuite rencontres bd aix...

 
Modern sediment supply to the lower delta plain of the Ganges-Brahmaputra River in Bangladesh

Modern sediment supply to the lower delta plain of the Ganges-Brahmaputra River in Bangladesh

rencontres ellezelles prostituee reze centre recherche rencontre paris les dix commandements la rencontre ballouchi tunisie rencontre rencontre femme vallet rencontre...

 
Congratulations to Cricket Team of Geography and Environment

Congratulations to Cricket Team of Geography and Environment

We are very pleased to inform all our PG-DU.com members that, Geography and Environment department of University of Dhaka has finally got the “Inter-department...